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in70mm.com Mission:
• To record the history of the large format movies and the 70mm cinemas as remembered by the people who worked with the films. Both during making and during running the films in projection rooms and as the audience, looking at the curved screen.
in70mm.com, a unique internet based magazine, with articles about 70mm cinemas, 70mm people, 70mm films, 70mm sound, 70mm film credits, 70mm history and 70mm technology. Readers and fans of 70mm are always welcome to contribute.

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Visit biografmuseet.dk about Danish cinemas

 

Can anyone identify mystery 35mm format?

Read more at
in70mm.com
The 70mm Newsletter
Written by: Thomas HauerslevDate: 13.12.2019
The 35mm clip seen to the right appears to be four vertical rows of sub-standard film format - possibly 8mm - printed side-by-side on a strip of 35mm film. Click the film clip to see large version

in70mm.com's Department for Unknown Film Formats has received an e-mail from Jim Slater, UK, asking for the help of in70mm.com readers:

Hi Thomas,

A fan of your site sent me this clip of a strange piece of film. Any chance that some of your readers might be able to identify it? At first I thought it might be something like a Kinetoscope film, perhaps, but it doesn’t seem to be that. I wonder if it is just a compilation of narrow gauge stuff, the sprocket holes are huge compared with the images. There is always something new to learn!

Best
Jim

The clip seen to the right appears to be four vertical rows of sub-standard film format - possibly 8mm - printed side-by-side on a strip of 35mm film. in70mm.com's Large Format Research, Department #106 is lost regarding sub-standard formats. We do not specialize in low-octane 35mm, and so we hope that among in70mm.com's enthusiastic and expert readership is a person who reads this announcement, and who can bring forward some information, which will answer Jim's questions.

• Who invented it?
• When was it invented?
• What is the name of the format?
• Where and how was it shown?

You can write directly to the editor (above) or to Jim Slater.

It's interesting to note that an almost similar scaled-up system was devised almost 50 years ago by Carl Zeiss (Germany), and presented as "Pik-A-Movie". Eight rows on Super-8mm films printed on 70mm stock.
 

More in 70mm reading:

Pik-A-Movie

New cinema history book "All Shapes and Sizes"

Artwork partly inspired by Todd-AO

Internet link:

 
Close-up of what is possibly four rows of 8mm film printed side-by-side on a strip of 35mm film. Click the film clip to see large version.

The original request for information came from Daniel Aguirre Hansell earlier in December, and he wrote:

Hello

Since you are the author of "All Shapes and Sizes", maybe you can help me with identifying something in my film collection. A while back I bought a 70mm film tin off eBay which contained various clippings from many different formats. Among these was this odd slug of nitrate film (at least I think it is nitrate,) and I have no clue as to what is was supposed to be for. When contacting the original seller, he had no recollection of where the tin came from. I have attached a professional photograph I took of the film in question. Upon closer inspection I found that it appeared to be copied from a source (note the sprocket holes printing into the film on the left.

Regards
Daniel

I hope this a nothing but a simple challenge for the readers of in70mm.com, and we look forward to hearing from you.

Merry Christmas and a happy New Year.
 

 
  
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Updated 13-12-19